AAP Horse Racing

Slow-maturing Famous faces talent test

By AAP Newswire

Famous is yet to live up to his name but if the Stan Fox Stakes record of trainers Peter and Paul Snowden is anything to go by, the horse might just make his mark.

The Snowdens have won the Group Two feature twice with Shooting To Win in 2014 and Denman five years earlier, the pair both going on to careers at stud.

Famous has the pedigree for success as a stallion being by Medaglia D'Oro out of dual Group winner A Time For Julia and fetching $750,000 as a yearling.

Co-trainer Paul Snowden says while the shifting of the Stan Fox Stakes (1500m) at Randwick on Saturday from its former timeslot in September to Caulfield Guineas day has changed the shape of the race, it remains significant.

"It has been moved back and the timing is a bit skewiff. I think that's probably why it's lost a bit of its force because of the Guineas being on the same day," Snowden said.

"But it's a nice race to win and it has certainly been a good horses' race."

Famous has won two of his four starts this campaign, most recently at Wyong.

The majority of his rivals are also unexposed and coming off provincial or midweek form references, including favourite Bottega.

Snowden says Famous has the makings of a quality horse but is a preparation away from the finished product and he views Saturday's race as a perfect stepping stone.

"He's a slow maturing type and I think he'll be better again with another three months under his belt," Snowden said.

"He's got provincial form but he's certainly got some talent there."

Famous will be one of three feature race runners for the Snowdens at Randwick along with Cosmic Force, early favourite for the Group Two Roman Consul Stakes (1200m), and Military Zone in the $500,000 Silver Eagle.

Boasting a Hawkesbury Guineas win over Trope, Military Zone resumed with a midfield effort at Caulfield and is undefeated second-up from a spell.

But his best form is on firm tracks so Snowden is hoping the forecast heavy rain does not eventuate.

"Don't take his first up run into consideration. Nothing made up ground the whole day down there and he was a backmarker," Snowden said.

"The intention was always to go down there and come back for this and he hasn't left an oat and he hasn't missed a beat.

"I think he's on track, as long as we get a firmer track."