National

Day 37 of the federal election campaign

By AAP Newswire

FEDERAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN: DAY 37, THE FINAL DAY

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WHERE THE LEADERS ARE CAMPAIGNING

* Prime Minister Scott Morrison: the battleground of Queensland with a blitz of key seats

* Labor leader Bill Shorten: TBC after death of Bob Hawke overnight

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WHAT THE COALITION WANTS TO TALK ABOUT

There'll be nothing new, just a repeat of "now is not a time for change" while being respectful of the death of Bob Hawke.

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WHAT LABOR WANTS TO TALK ABOUT:

It will be a difficult final day of campaigning after Bob Hawke's death, but Labor will want remind voters of their plans for a fair Australia.

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THE LATEST POLLS

* An Ipsos poll in the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age has the coalition closing the gap, but still behind 51 to 49 per cent on a two-party preferred basis. That compares to a 52 to 48 result favouring Labor in early May. The coalition's primary vote has risen from 36 per cent to 39, while Labor's has remained steady at 33 per cent.

* A YouGov/Galaxy poll in News Corp mastheads also has Labor on an election winning lead of 51-49 on a two-party preferred basis, despite the coalition lifting its primary vote two points to 39 per cent since April. A number of seats across the country are on 50-50 which will make election night tense for both sides.

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WHAT IS MAKING NEWS:

* The death of Bob Hawke overnight will dominate much of the news on Friday and make the last day of campaigning - which is normally full bore - difficult, especially for Bill Shorten. But both leaders have no choice but to continue with campaigning, including a breakfast television blitz.

* Tony Abbott has raised eyebrows with his tribute to Bob Hawke, considered to be Labor's greatest prime minister. Mr Abbott, a former PM, praised Hawke's reforming government as going against Labor tradition: "You might almost say he had a Labor heart, but a Liberal head."

* Unsurprisingly, the News Corp newspapers are urging a vote for the coalition in their election-eve editorials. The Nine newspapers - The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald - say Labor offers a better chance at stability, but warn against going too far with reforms. However, stablemate the Australian Financial Review backs the coalition "without great enthusiasm" for economic reasons.

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THEY SAID WHAT?

"I'm backing them, and I'm asking them to back me on Saturday." - Scott Morrison on the Australian voters.

"This election is a choice between Labor's plan for better hospitals and better schools versus bigger tax loopholes for the top end of town under the Liberals." - Bill Shorten.