News

Buck stops here

by
March 29, 2018

Amanda Grennan took her own life in 2017 after being cyberbullied.

Congratulations to The Telegraph (21/3/18) for the feature on the tragedy of cyber bullying.

When I served on a Federal Government Council — The Australian Council for Children and Parenting — we received many submissions and heard tragic stories about bullying and its impacts on the immediate and later lives of young people.

In so many cases the parents said they were quite unaware of its existence or, if they were aware, dismissive and did little to deal with the issue.

All too often if reported to the school, parents were fobbed off or told that it was under control.

Child neglect has become a serious reality in contemporary society, not just with bullying but parental neglect in terms of nutrition, alcohol and drug use, hazardous behaviour, sex education and general child well-being and encouragement of self confidence.

The days of parents sitting down at the dinner table with the kids with all the screens turned off (TV, phones and computers) has become near obsolete.

How many parents seriously evaluate their performance as parents or discuss the examples they themselves set for their children?

It is so easy to pass the buck to teachers or others in authority — the buck stops with parents — it’s up to us!

— Sandy MacKenzie,

Avenel

Children can be cruel

After once again reading about another tormented and traumatised young person taking their own life after cyber bullying I had to put pen to paper.

This does not only go on in social media it also goes on in the school ground and at amusement areas such as the skate park in Seymour.

My son is continually harassed and called names.

I have had to pull some these (for want of a better word) louts up myself so that my son can enjoy himself on his skateboard.

He asks me regularly why they harass him.

Some youngsters don’t take their own life, they retaliate with furious anger at their perpetrators who are constantly antagonising them.

Thank goodness he doesn’t have a computer.

— Mick Crozier,

Seymour

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